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Job 1:1-5 ESV

There was a man in the land of Uz whose name was Job, and that man was blameless and upright, one who feared God and turned away from evil. There were born to him seven sons and three daughters. He possessed 7,000 sheep, 3,000 camels, 500 yoke of oxen, and 500 female donkeys, and very many servants, so that this man was the greatest of all the people of the east. His sons used to go and hold a feast in the house of each one on his day, and they would send and invite their three sisters to eat and drink with them. And when the days of the feast had run their course, Job would send and consecrate them, and he would rise early in the morning and offer burnt offerings according to the number of them all. For Job said, “It may be that my children have sinned, and cursed God in their hearts.” Thus Job did continually.

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Our society tends to think of wealthy people as spoiled, greedy, and even downright evil. Job, however, was righteous as well as rich. The Bible records that he was, “blameless and upright, one who feared God and turned away from evil,” and that he, “was the greatest of all the people of the east,” in terms of livestock and servants.

Job was wealthy enough that none of his children had to work. They passed the time in feasting, and while the Bible doesn’t say whether they sinned in the course of their feasting, it does say that Job rose early in the morning to consecrate them and offer sacrifices on their behalf, “For Job said, ‘It may be that my children have sinned, and cursed God in their hearts.’

Job was wealthy, but he wasn’t spoiled or greedy, and certainly not evil. Clearly, Job thought of others before he thought of himself. He even went the extra mile, performing the proper rituals for his children just in case they sinned. “Thus Job did continually.

In the United States, the average American has a higher standard of living than royalty did a century ago. What do we do with our wealth? Rather than being blameless and upright like Job, most of us are apathetic and complacent. Forget the problem of evil–in our society, the problem is pleasure. When we lack nothing, we tend to forget the LORD our God, who gives us the power to get wealth. Perhaps Job sensed similar issues in his children, who passed their time by throwing parties.

Job would have to fear God more than most to have all those blessings and still remember the One ho gave them. Sometimes we look at other people with more than us and wonder why God doesn’t bless us too? But are we more like Job or his children? If we are more like Job’s children with our blessings, why should God bless us more?

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